Archive for the ‘laughter’ Category

Excerpt from Just Married Again, a Romantic Comedy

Sunday, November 29th, 2015

Here is an excerpt from Just Married Again, a Romantic Comedy, by Charlotte Hughes, released Nov 25, 2015:

Just Married AgainChecking the cooler, Maddy found the meat and re­frigerated items icy cold to the touch, but not frozen. She pulled the turkey out and slit open the plastic cover­ing so she could wash the bird. It wasn’t huge, but it was a respectable size and would provide leftovers for a cou­ple of days. Since it was close to lunchtime, she decided she would serve Thanksgiving dinner that evening. The bags she used to bake her turkeys in usually cut the cooking time in half.

Michael gazed at his wife from over the rim of his coffee cup as she prepared the turkey. Had he known he would be spending the holiday with her, he wouldn’t have dreaded it so much. She was the picture of domes­ticity, her shoulder-length hair pulled back, a clean apron tied around her waist. She had a tempting back­side, made even more so by the tight jeans she wore, and the cropped, dusky pink sweatshirt that rose beguilingly when she moved, offering him a glimpse of honey- colored flesh that made him forget about everything else. She reached into an overhead cabinet, and the hem of her shirt inched up her spine. He would have given his entire retirement account to have her turn around slightly and flash that delectable navel. He sighed heavily.

“Are you hot yet?” Danny said.

“Huh?” Michael glanced at him quickly. Was he that obvious? He could almost imagine his eyes rolling in his head and steam spewing out each ear.

“Have you warmed up enough to go back out?”

“Oh.” Michael took a shaky breath. Warm didn’t come close to describing how he was feeling, and if he stood up, it was likely his nephew would figure out his problem in one glance. “Let me finish my coffee,” he said, although he was in no hurry to leave the warm kitchen and the woman who made it seem even cozier.

“I’m going to visit the dogs for a minute,” the boy said.

“They’re in the bedroom,” Maddy told him. “Be sure to keep the door closed.”

Michael was only vaguely aware of Danny leaving the room; his eyes were trained on his wife. He didn’t know what she was looking for, but as she searched through one cabinet after another, she left the doors standing open. How many times had he warned her against that very thing? And how many times had she knocked herself silly as a result?

“Uh, Maddy—” he began, then winced when her noggin collided with the comer of one cabinet door.

“Ouch!” Maddy cried.

Michael jumped up and hurried toward her, closing cabinet doors in his path. “I knew that was going to happen. Here, let me see how bad it is.” He tilted her face back slightly. A red welt lay in her hairline. “It didn’t break the skin, but there’ll probably be a bruise.” He held up three fingers. “How many do you see?”

“Eight. But I was never good at math. Do you think I’ll need plastic surgery?”

“I’m afraid plastic surgery won’t work in your case. You’ll just have to be scarred for life. Probably, no man will ever look at you, so you might want to reconsider divorcing me.”

“Oh, my. I think I may have amnesia.”

It took only a second to realize she was kidding. “Oh, boy,” he said, affecting a serious tone. “Do you know your name?”

She looked thoughtful. “No, but I think I come from royalty. I seem to recall being addressed as Queen something-or-other.”

Grinning, Michael took one of her hands in his. “You’re Queen Mary, named after a prestigious ship. And I’m your most trusted servant, here to please you in every way, if you get my drift.” He gave her a hearty wink.

The touch of his hands on hers sent Maddy’s stom­ach aflutter. She tried to hide her discomfort. “Does the king know about this?”

“The king is old and blind and deaf.”

“The poor thing. I must go to him.”

“He still manages to drink and gamble and run with tainted, women, though, which is why you have no qualms about taking lovers.”

“Oh, is that all.” She tried to pull away.

“I’ve also seen him kick your dogs from time to time.”

Her eyes narrowed dangerously. “I’ll kill him.”

The bedroom door opened, and her dachshunds darted out before Danny could grab them. “Who’s that?” Maddy whispered, nodding toward the boy.

“He empties the palace chamber pots,” Michael re­plied, a split second before Rambo sank his teeth into the hem of his jeans and tugged with all his might. Mi­chael sighed and shook his head sadly.

“What’s going on?” Danny asked, his eyes widening at the sight before him.

“Your Aunt Maddy hit her head on a cabinet door.” He glanced once more at her wound. “You should be okay as long as you remember rule number one.”

“Which is?”

“Don’t leave dangerous, life-threatening cabinet doors open.” He examined one carefully as if inspecting it for further hazards. “These things should come with warning labels.” He turned to Danny. “Guess we’d bet­ter go get that wood.” He crossed the room, dragging the dog along with him. “We’ll have to hurry. Your aunt’s not safe here, and I don’t know how long this dog’s going to last with me dragging him through the snow.”

Maddy hurried over to Michael and pried the dog loose while Muffin sat up and begged for attention as well. Holding Rambo by the collar, she watched the two men bundle up and pull on the wading boots. She couldn’t help thinking how much Michael resembled the man she’d fallen in love with more than six years earlier. Of course, that was before he’d become con­sumed with his job, before he’d forgotten how to laugh and have fun.

She prayed the roads would be cleared soon.

Before she fell in love with Michael all over again.

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Blog Tour Announced for Welcome to Temptation

Monday, May 18th, 2015

Welcome To Temptation Front Small

On  May 20th, I will be stopping by 26 sites as part of my launch for Welcome to Temptation.  The book has made a splash already and has been in several of the Hot New Release lists on Amazon in its first week out. If you haven’t bought it yet Welcome to Temptation is still only 99 cents (in a special launch sale),  shop now!

 

 

1: Writer Wonderland 2: Room With Books 3: The Snarkology 4: 3 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, & Sissy, Too! 5: StarAngels Reviews 6: Undercover Book Reviews 7: Deal Sharing Aunt 8: Happily Ever After isn’t Just for Fairytale Diva’s 9: Tory Richards 10: The Pen and Muse Book Reviews 11: Welcome to My World of Dreams 12: It’s Raining Books 13: Straight from the Library 14: Long and Short Reviews 15: jbiggarblog 16: Unabridged Andra 17: CBY Book Club 18: Books & Other Spells 19: Romance Novel Giveaways 20: LittlePinkCrayon Book Reviews 21: Harps Romance Book Review 22: A Book Addict’s Delight 23: Buried Under Romance 24: Words of Wisdom from The Scarf Princess 25: Jen’s Reading Obsession 26: Romorror Fan Girl

Welcome to Temptation Released

Saturday, May 16th, 2015

Welcome To Temptation Front SmallJust released, a romance eBook exclusive to Amazon.  (Print books are available everywhere). Charlotte’s latest indie published romance is Welcome to Temptation. Buy now by clicking here.

 

Reckless, bad boy Cajun . . .


With a hurricane closing in on Temptation, Louisiana, Michelle Thurston fails to convince her stubborn grandmother to leave her home on the bayou. Sheriff Gator Landry arrives by boat, hell-bent on forcing the elderly recluse to evacuate. He is stunned to find Michelle, who was just 16 years old when he courted her one steamy summer.
Now, at 32, Michelle comes face-to-face with the man whose kisses tempted her to lose control, only this time there is no place to run. Although Gator is not about to leave the two women defenseless, Michelle can’t help but wonder if he is more dangerous to her than anything the storm can do.

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Charlotte Hughes is planning a brief blog tour on the 20th in support of Welcome to Temptation. Many of you probably remember that Charlotte was one of the first romance authors to do a virtual book tour, and she has not done any tours in a while. Watch this blog for more details about the Welcome to Temptation tour which will be at about 25 sites and it will be held on May 20th.

Practical Jokers

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

 

This youtube site is a hoot. Several members of the group play pranks on the unsuspecting public:

FunnyPranksMedia

 

 

A Fun Excerpt From See Bride Run

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

See Bride Run! Discounted from $5.99 to 2.99 for a limited time on Kindle starting Feb 2,2015. Buy it?SeeBrideRunfontrightfront

 

 

 
Pleading exhaustion to her current dance partner, Annie returned to the bar, only to find Darla and Hank missing. The bartender in overalls returned wearing a grin. “Some of your dance partners have taken a shine to you,” he said.

“They want to buy you a drink. Several, in fact. What’ll you have?”

“I don’t want anything right now,” Annie replied as politely as she could, considering her head felt as though it was ready to split open. “Would you happen to know where my friend went?”

“She left with that other feller. Said to tell you’d she’d be back in a jiffy.”

“When you see her, would you please tell her I’m waiting for her in the car?”

“What do I look like, Western Union?”

“I’m sorry to impose—”

“I’m just havin’ fun with you,” he said, his chubby face breaking into a grin. “I’ll tell her.”

Annie made her way out the door, leaving a good por­tion of the noise inside. She passed a couple of men sitting on the

tailgate of a truck but pretended not to see them.

“Hey, baby, you lookin’ for some comp’ny?”

“No thanks,” she said, and kept on walking.

“Hey, that ain’t no way to be,” one of them said as he caught up with her. “What’d I ever do to you?”

“Please—” She stopped and turned. He was a beefy fellow but she wasn’t sure if she should be scared or amused. He

spit a wad of chew­ing tobacco on the ground, and she shuddered. “I have a splitting headache, and I just want to be

alone,” she said. She resumed walking. Where the hell had Darla parked?

“I got a headache powder in the truck.”

Sure he did, Annie thought. And she had a hundred dollar bill in her pocket.

It finally hit her that Darla’s car was missing, and the thought of being stranded at a place like Ernie’s almost made her

weep. Why would Darla have left her? Espe­cially knowing she didn’t have a dime to her name? She didn’t even have

enough money to call anyone. Besides, who would she call?

“You can drink it down with a cold beer, and that headache’ll be history.”

Annie saw a car turn off the highway into the parking lot, and she prayed it was Darla’s. She almost went weak with

relief when it turned out to be a Jeep driven by Sam Ballard. He pulled up beside her.

“Out slumming tonight, Annie?”

“I beg your pardon?”

“If you’re looking for trouble, this is the place to find it.” Sam slammed the Jeep into park and climbed out. Annie

noticed the stranger’s friend had come up and both of them towered over Sam.

“I asked you what the hell you’re doing and who these men are?” he almost shouted.

Annie’s jaw dropped. “I don’t have to take this—”

The man next to Annie nudged her. “Do you know this guy?”

“Yes, I—”

“I happen to be her husband,” Sam said, his words clipped and precise. “She has a new baby at home wait­ing to be

nursed. She told me she was running to the store for disposable diapers.”

“Oh, well—” The man looked from Sam to Annie and back to Sam. “Hey, man, we don’t want to cause no trouble

between married folks. Me and my brother was just passing through town.” He regarded Annie. “You should be home

with your kid, lady.” He looked at the other man. “C’mon, let’s get outta here.”

Annie was glad it was dark and nobody could see the crimson color on her face. “That was despicable,” she told Sam.

“Would you rather see me get beat up by the rhino brothers?” He didn’t give her time to answer. “Where’s Darla, and

what the hell are you doing in a dark parking lot with some men you don’t know?”

“I don’t know where Darla is, and I don’t have to answer your questions.”

“Great. Then I’ll just leave you here to fend for your­self.” He turned and climbed back inside the Jeep.

“Wait!” Annie hurried over. “Darla’s car is gone. She took off with some guy named Hank.”

“So you decided to wait for her in a parking lot filled with drunk rednecks and bikers. Great idea, Annie,” he said,

sarcasm ringing loud in his voice. “Now I see why your father had to make your decisions.” He regretted his choice of

words the min­ute they left his mouth, the very second he saw Annie’s face fall. But, dammit, she could have gotten in

bad trouble there.

Sudden tears stung her eyes. “You can just go straight to hell for all I care.” She started walking.

He pulled up beside her. “I’m sorry, Annie. That was a lousy thing for me to say. Get in the car, and I’ll take you back

to Darla’s.”

“I’d rather walk.”

“You can’t walk. It’s dangerous this time of night.”

“I can take care of myself. Contrary to what you might think,” she added angrily.

They had reached the highway. “I’ll bet you don’t even know how to get to Darla’s trailer.”

Annie wasn’t listening. It had been such a miserable day, not to mention humiliating as hell, and her head felt as

though it would explode. She had spent the better part of the evening wondering what she was going to do with her life

and cursing the fact that she hadn’t taken charge long ago. The last thing she needed was for Sam Ballard to show up

and rub her nose in it.

“Annie, I’m warning you, either get in the Jeep, or I’ll person­ally put you in.”

She kept walking.

Sam gunned his engine and parked a good distance ahead of her. He climbed out, then slammed the door so hard, his

Jeep rocked on its wheels. Teeth gritted, he closed the distance between him and Annie, then, with­out warning, hefted

her up and threw her over his shoul­der. She kicked and squealed like a stuck pig.

“Shut up, dammit!” he ordered. “Folks’ll think I’m kidnapping you.” She screamed louder, and he gave her a sound

whack on the behind.

Annie saw red. She kicked her legs and flailed her arms and finally grabbed a handful of his hair. Sam let a few

obscenities fly before he realized someone had pulled up behind them. He turned but was blinded by headlights. He

blinked several times before he realized it was the highway patrol.

“Dammit to hell, Annie, look, what you’ve done now.” He heard the door open and close, was barely able to make out

the silhouette of a patrolman.

“What’s going on here?” the uniformed man said.

Annie continued to pummel Sam in the back but glanced around at the sound of another’s voice. “Oh, Officer, thank

God you’re here. I’m being abducted.”

“Abducted, huh?” The patrolman spit what looked like a wad of chewing tobacco on the ground, and Annie wondered if

everybody in Pinckney chewed it. “Well, we don’t put up with the likes of that in Pinckney, Georgia ma’am.” He reached

for his gun. “I reckon I don’t have any choice but to shoot him.”

 In disbelief, Annie watched the patrolman pull his gun out of the holster and aim it at Sam. She screamed. “No, wait!”

“Put her down, pal,” the armed man said. “I’m warn­ing you, I got this sucker aimed right for your goozle.”

Sam sighed heavily and dropped Annie to the ground. She landed in a heap.

“Now move away, lady, so I can finish him off.”

“Officer, please let me explain,” Annie cried, crawling along the gravel as fast as she could. She pulled herself up by the

man’s pants leg. “He, uh, Mr. Ballard here, was only offering me a ride. I was lying about being abducted.”

“He probably told you to say that, didn’t he?” The patrolman pushed her aside. “You need to turn your head, miss. I’ve

done this sort of thing before, and it ain’t a pretty sight.”

“Oh, my God, no!” Annie threw herself in front of Sam, acting as a shield.

Sam stood there with his arms crossed over his chest, the lines in his face tense, as if holding himself in check while

Annie sobbed and carried on like a character in a bad soap opera. “Okay, Buster, you’ve had your fun. I’d like to go

home now.”

The other man chuckled and stuck his revolver back in its holster. “Listen, Sambo, you’re going to have to learn to start

charming the ladies a little better. You can’t just throw a woman over your shoulder like a sack of taters and haul her

off. You have to buy them flowers and candy and—” He paused and looked around as though wanting to make sure they

weren’t overheard. “You might have to write a few lines of poetry. It don’t matter if it don’t rhyme.”

Annie’s head swiveled from side to side. “Excuse me, but do you two know each other?”

Sam looked at her. “This is Johnny Ballard, my cousin. Folks call him Buster. He’s a real prankster.”

“So all this was just a big joke at my expense,” she said. She glared at Sam. “You let me grovel and beg for your life like

some idiot nutcase. How dare you!”

A car screeched to a halt, and Darla jumped out and came running. She looked panicked. “What’s wrong? Is somebody

hurt?”

“Well, now, ain’t you a sight for sore eyes,” Buster said. “Why don’t you and me go for a spin in my patrol car. I’ll even

let you play with my siren.”

“Annie, what’s going on?” Darla asked.

Annie tried to explain everything that had happened since she’d last seen her friend. It was all she could do to get the

words out, what with her stammering and sput­tering. Her heart was still racing.

“Didn’t the bartender give you my message?” Darla asked. “Hank needed cigarettes. I told the bartender to tell you I

was going to the convenience store not far from here, and that I’d be right back. Only, I didn’t know Hank was going to

hang around and look at dirty magazines.”

“Would you please take me home?” Annie asked, re­alizing that she was trembling. “You’re welcome to go back to

Ernie’s and stay as long as you like, but I’m exhausted.”

“Sure, honey. We can go.”

“I’ll walk back,” Hank said, having come up in the meantime. He kissed Darla on the cheek. “I’ll call you, babe.”

Buster put his hand on Annie’s shoulder. “I hope I didn’t scare you, young lady. Sam and I are always cut­ting up.”

“Actually, I think the whole scene was disgraceful,” she said. “I hope you have your little notebook handy because you

need to file assault and battery charges.”

Buster looked startled as he reached into his pocket. “Is this for real?”

“I’ll let you decide,” Annie told him. She balled her hand into a tight fist, swung around with all her might, and

slammed it into Sam Ballard’s face. Sam, caught off guard, reeled back, lost his footing and sank to the ground.

Take me to the Book

Laughing Out Loud(er)

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

When I wrote my last blog, Laughing Out Loud, I did not know all the health benefits derived from chuckling to guffawing. I already knew that laughter released endorphins, which makes you feel good. It improves your outlook. Your husband might appear better looking, for example.

The Big Wow is how it can reduce heart attacks, and the Bigger Wow is to what extent it can reduce the risk of SECOND heart attacks. Check it out from CNN:

http://youtu.be/JTYbGYSRRVg

Laughing Out Loud

Friday, December 26th, 2014

I know that I’ve been MIA for quite some time now. As someone who is trying to pass herself off as a comedy writer, I debated sharing “non-comedic” information; but I hope to reach out to those of you who might need a bit of Christmas cheer in your stocking.


 After a long battle, I lost my mom—my best friend—to cancer on March 25, 2011. The details aren’t important. What is important is how I got through it and how others who have written to me got through tough times as well.

We looked for reasons to laugh.

I published my first book in 1987, and since that time I have received hundreds of letters from readers who have suffered hardships—illness, death, divorce, unemployment—you name it, and they thanked me for making them laugh during those bleak periods.

When it was time for me to move on, I could not wrap my head around writing a 90K-100K word book. Fortunately, I was offered a position with a very nice agent; critiquing, line-editing, and mentoring new authors, which I did for a couple of years. I’m glad I had the opportunity because anyone who has ever tried to write a book knows how isolating the task. That was the last thing I needed. I found working with new authors very therapeutic, and I made a number of friends in the process.

Once I decided it was time to get back to the business of writing, I discovered the market had changed drastically and e-books were very popular. So I pulled out a couple of old romances and began the process of updating, revising, polishing, and more revising. At times it was tedious, but I realized something I had forgotten. I was pretty damn funny. As in laugh-out-loud, belly-busting, stitch-in-the-side funny. It sort of made up for all those blasted revisions. (Big eye-roll.)

It felt good to laugh. It felt wonderful! The dark clouds above me parted, and I was suddenly surrounded by pure sunshine. (Okay, I’m exaggerating. The only thing that reminds me of pure sunshine is laundry detergent with a bleach alternative, but this is my article, even if some of it is over-the-top.)

My romances will never earn a Pulitzer or hit the NY Times, but they weren’t meant to. They were written to entertain.

I was so thrilled to realize I had not forgotten to smile or laugh that I purchased a whole slew of old Archie and Jughead comic books! I put them in a basket beside my bed, and I actually read them. What a great idea! Instead of watching the eleven o’clock news and hearing all the awful stories—believe me, those stories will still be there in the morning—I had a blast reading about Archie, Jughead, Betty, and Veronica.

Despite times of sorrow, we eventually have to get back to the task of living our lives. I don’t know about you, but I would rather do it with a smile on my face.

Excerpt From See Bride Run! a Romantic Comedy

Thursday, December 25th, 2014
Romance Novel Book Cover

See Bride Run
Charlotte Hughes

 

 

 

Buy the book in Kindle format from Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Ballard had just accused his head waitress, Darla Mae Jenkins, of cheating at cards when she suddenly noticed the commotion in front of the Dixieland Café.

“Great balls of fire! Would’ja get a load of that!”

Sam swiveled around on the red vinyl counter stool and gave a low whistle at the sight of the white stretch limo sitting in the middle of Main Street. “Well, now. I wasn’t aware of any celebrities visiting Pinckney. Must be here for the Okra Festival,” he added. He’d barely gotten the words out of his mouth before he noticed smoke seeping out from beneath the hood. “Uh-oh, looks like trouble in Tinsel town. I’d better go see about it.”

“Hey, wait for me,” Darla said, following him out of the restaurant. A number of people had already gathered on the side­walk, including Mott Henry, the town drunk. From the looks of it, he hadn’t shaved or bathed in days. He watched the excitement for a moment, then turned and moseyed down the sidewalk toward the liquor store, ob­viously more interested in buying his next bottle than the commotion in the street. The Petrie sisters, still spry in their eighties, stood at the edge of the crowd, each holding a brown sack from Odom’s Grocery. They craned their necks to see over a group of teenage boys. “Is anyone in there?” a man in the crowd called out. “You can’t see diddly with them tinted windows.”

“I can’t figure it,” Darla said. “Why would anybody put tinted windows in a danged limo? Shoot, if I was riding in one of those suckers, I’d want the whole world to see.”

Sam was amused by the town’s response to the limo. One would have thought a flying saucer had just landed on Main Street, and everybody was waiting for the hatch to open. It just proved the town needed more in the way of entertain­ment. Mechanic, Bic Fenwick, owner of Fenwick’s Towing and Garage, happened by at that moment in his tow truck. He parked on the side of the street, climbed from his truck, and hurried over. “What’s goin’ on?” he asked Sam.

Sam shook his head. “I just got here. Darla and I saw smoke coming from beneath the hood. I figured I should investigate.”

Bic knocked on the driver’s window. “Hey there, did you know you got smoke comin’ out from under your hood?”

Sam chuckled. “I’d say it was a given, Bic.”

“Well, you never know what people can see with them tinted windows,” Bic said. He pressed his face against the window and squinted. “You want me to take a gan­der at what’s under your hood?” he shouted, as if the tinted windows might interfere with the person’s hearing as well.

Sam figured whoever was in the limo was having a good laugh. The window whispered down some five or six inches. Sam found himself looking into a pair of incredibly pretty green eyes, so pretty, in fact that he tried to think of the exact color and decided they must be what people referred to as Kelly-green. Her face was equally pretty, framed by hair the color of ripened wheat. Some kind of net clung to the fat curls, and Sam thought he caught sight of a pink tiara. He leaned forward. “Excuse me, miss, but you can’t leave this thing sitting in the middle of the road. You’re blocking traffic.”

As if to prove his point, a man in a pickup truck blew his horn. Sam waved him around. Annie gave an enormous sigh. As if her day had not been bad enough. She had spent the last half hour trying to make it from the interstate to the town of Pinckney before the limo died because she could not bear the thought of walking eight to ten miles in her wedding gown. Not only that, she was furious with Snedley. How could a paid chauffeur not know the limo was on the verge of having major problems? She supposed she should cut him some slack because his prostate problem had probably garnered much of his attention.

“Did you hear me, miss?” Sam asked. “You’re going to have to move your vehicle. You’re blocking traffic,” he repeated.

Annie could not hide her annoyance. Did the man think her daft, for Pete’s sake? She knew she was blocking traffic, but there wasn’t a damn thing she could do about it. “Thanks for your input, Einstein,” she said loudly, “but it won’t budge so I don’t have much choice in the matter.”

Bic looked at Sam. “Einstein?” he repeated. “I don’t think she appreciated what you said.”

“Well, lucky for me I’m not trying to win a popularity contest,” Sam told Bic, even though he was peeved that the woman had resorted to name calling. “I need for it to be gone before my early bird customers arrive,” he added.

“How come you’re worried about people parking at the curb?” Bic asked. “You’ve got that big parking lot on the side and back of the restaurant?”

“Because a couple of my early bird customers are in wheelchairs, and some of the others just have a hard time getting around. It’s easier for their families to park in front of the restaurant and help them to the door.”

“I’ll see what I can do,” Bic said. “Maybe I can figure out what’s causing all that smoke.” He addressed the woman inside of the car. “Miss, do you see a hood release in there?” he asked and told her where to look for it. He glanced at Sam and rolled his eyes. “’Least that’s where you’d find a hood release in most cars. No telling where they put ’em in these big suckers.”

“Probably next to the wet bar and Jacuzzi,” Sam said quietly. The woman in the car might have the prettiest green eyes he’d ever seen, but damned if he was going to get involved in a verbal tussle with her. Sam heard a metallic click, and Bic opened the hood. Smoke billowed out like a mushroom cloud.

“Jeez, Louise!” Bic said, backing away from the vehicle and snatching a cloth from his back pocket which he used to wipe his face.

“What’s going on here?” a voice said. Sam turned and found himself staring into Sheriff Harry Hester’s face. He was so bald that most folks called him Howie—for Howie Mandel—behind his back.

Bic answered. “This here limo is putting out more smoke than a bonfire. I’m trying to figure out what’s causing it.” Sam leaned close to the sheriff. “There is a lady inside. I may as well tell you, she’s a bit mouthy.”

“Oh, yeah?” Hester said. “We’ll see about that.” Sixty-year-old Marge Dix elbowed her way through the crowd. Most considered her a sourpuss. “Would you just look at that?” she said, her voice bristling with in­dignation. “Here we have starving people in this world, and we got folks driving cars the size of mo­bile homes. I hope whoever it is doesn’t plan on settling in Pinckney. I just can’t abide such vulgarity. Makes me ill, that’s what it does.”

Darla, who had been quiet up to that moment, pretended to give Marge a sympathetic look. “Then I wouldn’t look if I were you, Marge, honey,” Darla said. “If something made me that sick, I’d march right home, lock the doors, and pull the shades.”

Marge regarded Darla. “The Bible says we should store our treasures in heaven.”

“Some of us don’t want to wait that long for nice things,” the waitress replied.

Sheriff Hester stepped closer to the limo and tried to peer at the woman through the crack. “Miss, I need to see your driver’s license,” he said, “and I may as well tell you, a little kindness goes a long way in this town so you might want to be a bit more tolerant of our citizens.”

“You go, Howie,” Darla said.

Hester shot her a dark look. “Watch it, Darla Mae, or I’ll write you a ticket for having an eighteen-wheeler parked in your front yard last weekend.”

Annie gave another sigh. She should have taken a chance and gone back inside the church for her purse. She wished she could magically disappear; instead, it looked as though she was going to suffer her share of indignities. “I’m sorry Sheriff, but I do not have my license with me.” Annie waited, knowing he would derive a great deal of pleasure from that fact.

“Oh, really?” Sheriff Hester looked about the crowd. “Seems these rich folks don’t have to follow the same rules as the rest of us,” he said.

“That’s precisely what I’m talking about,” Marge Dix said to Darla. “Some people think they are better than us normal folks.” Marge looked at the sheriff. “Driving without a license carries a stiff fine, doesn’t it, Sheriff Hester?”

Sam frowned. He’d never cared for Marge Dix who was the town busybody.

“A fine?” Hester said. “Oh, yes. Not to mention possible jail time.” A smile twitched the corners of his lips. He was obviously enjoying himself. “She’d better show me a registration for that thing, or there’ll be a hanging in the courthouse square.” Several in the crowd chuckled.

Darla threw up her hands. “I don’t believe what I’m hearing.” She looked at Sam. “Do something!”

Sam pulled Hester aside. “I would tone it down if I were you,” he told Hester. “You don’t want to get hit with a lawsuit. If someone can afford to drive a car like this they probably have enough money to keep a lawyer on retainer.”

Annie was past being angry; she was furious. The man was no better than her father; out to make people feel small and stupid. “Then get your rope ready, Barney Fife,” she yelled as loud as she could, “because I don’t have the registration either.”

Darla laughed out loud. “You go, girl!” Several of the onlookers cheered.

The sheriff colored fiercely. He stepped closer to the limo and leaned forward to get a better look at Annie. “Sam was right; you do have a mouth on you,” he said, “but as an elected official, sworn to protect the citizens of this town, I do not appreciate you acting disrespectful to me.”

“Let’s get something straight, Sheriff,” Annie said. “First of all, I’m no threat to anyone. I don’t own a weapon and never have. You are free to search my vehicle. “Secondly, I have the utmost respect for law officials, but I will not tolerate being publicly ridiculed just so you can look like a big shot. Further, I don’t know that you aren’t some kind of nutcase who would actually hang me in the courthouse square, shoot me, or lock me up for the rest of my life so I consider that a threat. However, I do have rights so I’m allowed to call my attorney, and when he is finished with you, you’ll regret ever laying eyes on me.” Annie smiled. So what’s it going to be, Sheriff?”

“She’s good,” Darla whispered to Sam.

Sam shrugged. “Not bad,” he said.

In a flash, Sheriff Hester’s demeanor changed. “How’m I supposed to know this automo­bile belongs to you?”

“You could give her sodium pentothal,” Marge sug­gested.

Annie didn’t hesitate. “This vehicle belongs to my father. I borrowed it.”

“You borrowed it,” Hester said flatly. “Who is your father?”

Annie glanced at the woman beside him, Marge something-or-other, who was clearly the town gossip. “I would rather not say at this time.”

Hester seemed to understand. “Okay,” he said to the crowd. I want everybody to back away from the vehicle. Not you, Bic,” he added quickly. “You keep looking under the hood; see what you can find out.” Bic nodded and went back to what he was doing. “As for the rest of you, if you insist on hanging around you can stand on the sidewalk. You, too, Marge,” he added. He looked at Sam and Darla. “I would appreciate it if you two would stay put.”

“That’s not fair!” Marge said.

“They’re witnesses,” Hester said, sounding irritated with her, “not that I should have to defend my decision. Now move to the sidewalk or go home,” he added. Marge gave him a dirty look but did as she was told.

Sheriff Hester turned back to Annie. “I hope when you speak to your attorney you’ll tell him I did not drag you to the station for questioning, that I allowed you to sit in your daddy’s comfy limo with the window rolled down only a few inches, and that I assured you every word would be handled in the strictest of confidence. This is not how I normally conduct my, um, interviews.” He produced a small notebook and pen. “Now, then, where were we?”

“You asked me to give you my father’s name,” she said. “It is Winston Hartford. I am Katherine Anne Hartford, although I prefer to be called Annie since it is less formal.”

“And where are you from, Miss Hartford?” Hester asked. “Atlanta.” Sam let out a low whistle. Darla and Hester looked at him. “What? Hester asked. “Am I missing something?”

“Depends,” Sam said, not taking his eyes off Annie. “Your father wouldn’t happen to be in the iron and steel business?”

“Yes,” Annie said. “Very impressive,” Sam replied.

“Do you know her father?” Darla asked before Hester had a chance.

“I know of him,” Sam said. He looked at Hester. “Miss Hartford is heir to one of the biggest iron and steel companies in the southeast.”

Annie blushed. She always felt uncomfortable when people discussed the family finances.

Harry hooked his thumbs inside his belt. He seemed to ponder Sam’s words. “If that’s true, then I’m very impressed, but without a driver’s license or other form of ID, there’s no way to prove it.”

“You can’t disprove it,” Sam said.

“My father’s picture, as well as his business and other ventures are all over the Internet,” Annie said. “As is information about me.” She looked at Hester. “I would hope that would serve as an I.D. for now.”

For now, what I’d really like is for you to step out of the car,” Hester said.

Annie paled at the thought. A number of people were still watching from the sidewalk, including the nosy blabbermouth, Marge. Annie would be the laugh­ingstock of the town once they saw her in all her wedding garb. “I would rather not,” she said.

The sheriff looked surprised. “Is there a problem? Are you handicapped in some way? Do I need to send for a wheelchair?”

“No, nothing like that,” she said quickly. “It’s just—”

“I have been very patient with you, Miss,” he said. “Now, please remove yourself from the vehicle.”

Giving an enormous sigh, Annie hit the automatic door unlock and reached for the handle. The sheriff stepped back as she opened the door and tried to extri­cate herself from the front seat of the limousine. Her cheeks flamed a bright red as the crowd stared in disbe­lief.

The woman in the waitress uniform hurried over and tried to help her. Once Annie was out and standing among them, everybody stared. “Oh, my Lord,” Darla said. “I’ve never seen anything like that.”

Annie longed to crawl beneath a large rock and never come out. Sam stared as well at what looked to be hundreds of yards of white satin and lace that made up the most elaborate bridal gown he’d ever laid eyes on. She still wore her veil although it hung askew, and her tiara looked as though it was barely hanging on. Seeing her face in the light was almost humbling. Her facial bones were delicate and very femi­nine, her skin flawless and glowing. Her mouth was full and sexy as hell. He could not help but stare openly.

Romance Novel Book Cover

See Bride Run
Charlotte Hughes

Have a Laugh With Charlotte at RomanceBandits

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Charlotte is interviewed today at Romance Bandits Blogspot and before I could get this posted there were already 65 comments on the interview:  http://romancebandits.blogspot.com/2009/04/have-laugh-with-charlotte-hughes.html .

FYI the new title for the third book in the Crazy series has been officially changed to HIGH ANXIETY.

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